Geology: THE ORIGINS OF DOLOMITES

Lecture meetings take place in the S H Reynolds lecture Theatre, Wills Memorial Building, University of Bristol, BS8 1RJ. For those unfamiliar with this venue: Enter the Wills Building via main entrance and walk ahead between the two staircases. Turn right when you reach some display cases. The lecture room is on your left. Start time is 19:30

Professor Maurice Tucker           Wednesday 29 March 2017 at 7.30 p.m.

Dolomite is a common sedimentary rock – plenty in the Bristol district and South Wales in the Carboniferous and Triassic, but there is a problem in explaining its origin. Seawater is supersaturated with respect to dolomite but it does not precipitate there; dolomite appears to increase in abundance back through time, being especially common in the Precambrian; to dolomitise a limestone needs much Mg and through-flow of water – but how does that work? Dolomites are very important as reservoirs for oil and hosts of lead-zinc sulphide deposits, so understanding their origin and geometry is important. This talk will examine dolomites from around the world and up and down the geological column and discuss the hot topic as to whether microbes provide the answer.

Members of WEGA and other local geological societies are invited to attend and bring proposals for field meetings for 2017.

Following a career in Logistics and Procurement I am now focussing on volunteering with particular interests in the natural world and environmental issues. I'm currently volunteering with Transition Clevedon, BRERC and Clevedon Pier. With bristol Nats I am the President of the Geology Section and Society Treasurer (From mid- 2016)

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